Check out the Great Southern’s spectacular forests

Published Friday, July 21, 2017 in Talking Local

With Planet Ark’s National Tree Day on July 30, let’s take a look at some of the must-see tree-based experiences for holiday-makers to the South-West region.

Western Australia’s South-West has some of the most spectacular, and unique, forests in the world — and you can visit all of them.

Photograph by Nic Duncan

Valley of the Giants

The Valley of the Giants Treetop Walk allows you to get a possum’s eye view of the majestic Karri Forests Region near Walpole on the South Coast.

Climb 40 metres up into the canopy of the forest to experience these 400-year-old eucalyptus trees. The 600-metre walk is on a steady gradient, so it’s suitable for all ages and abilities, and for those in wheelchairs.

These particular trees are known by conservationists and locals as “the Ancient Empire”. The walk ends by a magnificent, gnarled old tingle tree, known as the Grandma Tingle, or the Gatekeeper.

The Giant Tingle Tree

This incredible tree has a 24-metre girth, making it the fattest eucalypt in the world. But what makes it extra-special is that it has been hollowed out by a fire — making it a popular tourist attraction, as whole families stand under the tree’s hollow to get their photos taken.

The Giant Tingle can be found on a beautiful 800-metre looped walk, just off Hilltop Road, near Walpole.

Unique Tuart forests

Much of Western Australia’s natural woodland is found nowhere else in the world. Among the unique and beautiful species is the Tuart tree — found just outside Busselton.

The trees were milled extensively during colonial times but the last remnants of the trees are protected by the Tuart Forest National Park. Some trees are more than 33 metres high and 10 metres in girth.

While the trees themselves are wonderful, the National Park is also the perfect place to go possum spotting! This fun, family, night-time activity takes place along an easy 1.5 kilometre, one-hour walk, starting from the Layman picnic site. It’s a self-guided trail, so you need your own torch, but it’s a fun activity and you should have no problem spotting these cute native animals.

The Gloucester Tree

Climbing the Gloucester Tree near Pemberton has been something of a rite of passage for West Australians for generations. And it’s not for the faint-hearted. This 58-metre climb up a giant Karri tree hasn’t changed much since the climbing rails were installed in 1947 — when the tree served as a fire lookout platform.

Those who make the hair-raising climb are rewarded with spectacular views of the surrounding forest and farmland.

Private Properties has a number of holiday homes in in Denmark & Walpole and Albany that are close to these natural attractions.

Chirriger on Inlet, overlooking Nornalup Inlet is a luxurious modern holiday home, secluded within the treetops, boasting wonderful views and yet close to town.

Chirriger on Inlet

Chirriger on Inlet, Walpole

Woodstock in Denmark is nestled in native bushland with views across to the countryside to the ocean. A comfortable, family home close to local attractions and the Bibbulman track.

Woodstock, Denmark

Woodstock, Denmark

 

Book a green escape here to enjoy the globally recognised biodiversity hotspots in Western Australia’s South-West.

 

You might also like to read these Blogs:

Where to find the best waterfalls in the South West

A day out in Albany

Everything you need to know about whale watching in the South West